IKEA launches its first flat electric car – and opinions are seriously divided

The automobile from IKEA: Brits could be among the main on the planet to drive new Swedish level pack e-vehicle that costs £8,700

  • It gauges a fifth of most electric vehicles and has a removable convenient battery


The UK could be quite possibly the earliest country on the planet to get a recently planned electric vehicle which comes in flatpack structure.

The run-around city vehicle known as Luvly O was developed by Swedish technology company Luvly and could be seen on British roads by the end of the year.

According to The Telegraph, Luvly O has a portable battery that can be charged from your desk at work and weighs a fifth of what most electric vehicles do.

It will be the first of its kind; however, in contrast to Ikea, the flat-packed design will be shipped to factories all over the world rather than delivered to your front door.

The founder and CEO of Luvly, Hkan Lutz, stated to The Telegraph: We would think that it would be beneficial to gather in your home if it were technically and legally feasible, but sadly, neither of those things are the case.

IKEA launches its first flat electric car - and opinions are seriously divided
Swedish innovation firm Luvly planned Luvly O as a go around city vehicle which could be spotted on English streets before the year’s over



Rough aspects are 270cm x 153cm x 144cm and it cruise all over 6 miles prior to requiring a re-energize and can reach 55mph

IKEA launches its first flat electric car - and opinions are seriously dividedIKEA launches its first flat electric car - and opinions are seriously divided

The LUVs are sent flatpack for gathering in microfactories near end-clients

The clever vehicle has a distance scope of 62 miles at a maximum velocity of 55mph.

The vehicle won’t require a gas station or an electric center you can eliminate the two batteries and charge them at home or in the workplace.

By the end of the year, Brits could spot one or two of these new designs driving down the road for £8,700.



Even though it is small and doesn’t have an engine, its creators say it has some similarities to Formula One cars, like energy absorbers around the chassis that keep drivers safe.

Mr. Lutz stated: These, in my opinion, would be just right for the United Kingdom. One of these cars makes more sense in a larger city.’ We hope to get some cars on the road this year, but as you know, developing new technology always takes longer than expected.

The plan is to get started as soon as possible. Even though you might see one or two of them driving down the street, the Swedish company said that a widespread rollout wouldn’t happen for a few years.

In microfactories close to end users, the LUVs are shipped flatpack for assembly. This fundamentally diminishes costs and natural effect.



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